Rogues are masterful burglars, swindlers, cutpurses or assassins. Often career criminals, they master a wide array of skills and trades in their pursuit of illicit activities. These scoundrels become experts at the art of being unseen, and knowing precisely when their opponent is most vulnerable to strike. An adventurer who wishes to delve into dungeons would be wise to be wary of traps, locks and illusions; all cornerstone components in a rogue's bag of tricks.

 

  • Strength is not important for rogues, but it can be helpful for saving throws or for commonly associated skill checks (such as athletics).

  • Dexterity is vital for rogues for the extra AC, for dual-wielding or using ranged or finesse weapons. It is also helpful for saving throws or for commonly associated skill checks (such as stealth, acrobatics or sleight of hand).

  • Constitution is not important for rogues for the extra HP. It is also helpful for saving throws.

  • Intelligence is not important for rogues, but it can be helpful for saving throws or for commonly associated skill checks (such as investigation).

  • Wisdom is not important for rogues, but it can be helpful for saving throws or for commonly associated skill checks (such as perception).

  • Charisma is not important for rogues, but it can be helpful for saving throws or for commonly associated skill checks (such as deception or persuasion).

Expertise

At 1st level, choose two of your skill proficiencies. Your proficiency bonus is doubled for any ability check you make that uses either of the chosen proficiencies.

 

At 6th level, you can choose two more of your proficiencies (in skills) to gain this benefit.
 

Sneak Attack

Beginning at 1st level, you know how to strike subtly and exploit a foe's distraction. Once per turn, you can deal an extra 1d6 damage to one creature you hit with an attack if you have advantage on the attack roll. Advantage on the attack roll can be waived if the target has another conscious enemy within Close Range (within 3 m), and you don't have disadvantage on the attack roll. The attack must use a finesse or a ranged weapon.

 

The amount of the extra damage increases as you gain levels in this class, as shown in the Sneak Attack column.

Thieves’ Cant

During your rogue training you learned Thieves' Cant, a secret mix of dialect, jargon, and code that allows you to hide messages in seemingly normal conversation. Only another creature that knows Thieves' Cant understands such messages. It takes four times longer to convey such a message than it does to speak the same idea plainly.

 

In addition, you understand a set of secret signs and symbols used to convey short, simple messages, such as whether an area is dangerous or the territory of a thieves' guild, whether loot is nearby, or whether the people in an area are easy marks or will provide a safe house for thieves on the run.

Cunning Action

Starting at 2nd level, your quick thinking and agility allow you to move and act quickly. You may take the Use an Object, Disengage, or Hide Actions as a Bonus Action on your turn. Alternatively, you may expend a Bonus Action to gain an additional Movement Action on your turn.

Assassinate

Beginning at 3rd level, you know how to strike for the vitals and catch an opponent who is unprepared. During the first round, your attack is at advantage and does critical damage, so long as your target has not taken a turn yet that round.
 

Uncanny Dodge

Starting at 5th level, when an attacker that you can see successfully hits you with an attack, you can use your Reaction to halve the attack's damage against you.
 

Evasion

Beginning at 7th level, you can nimbly dodge out of the way of some hazards. When you are subjected to an effect that allows you to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage, you instead take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw, and only half damage if you fail.
 

Infiltration Expertise

Starting at 9th level, you can unfailingly create false identities for yourself. You must spend seven days and 25 gold coins to establish the history, profession, and affiliations for an identity. You can't establish an identity that belongs to someone else. For example, you might acquire appropriate clothing, letters of introduction, and official- looking certification to establish yourself as a member of a trading house from a remote city so you can insinuate yourself into the company of other wealthy merchants.

 

Thereafter, if you adopt the new identity as a disguise, other creatures believe you to be that person until given an obvious reason not to. (Unlike an illusion, there are no associated skill checks. It is up to the players involved to act appropriately.)